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Here’s Where to Party in Los Angeles on Cinco de Mayo 2016

Here’s Where to Party in Los Angeles on Cinco de Mayo 2016


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Mezcal, margaritas, and tacos, oh my!

Plan Check will be offering festive specials including a "cheeseburger machismo" with habanero cheese and $8 Oaxacan sours.

This Thursday is May 5 so it is almost time to start celebrating Cinco de Mayo.

Here are a few places for tequilas and tacos in the southland:

El Chayo in Hollywood will treat guests to live music, street corn, tacos, and Mezcal cocktails from 4 p.m. till closing time.

Plan Check Kitchen and Bar in downtown, Fairfax, and Sawtelle locations will offer Mexican twists on classic favorites such as the cheeseburger Machismo with habanero cheese and the pimento grilled cheese with bacon. Other tasty dishes con especia served will include jalapeño escabeche, fried onions, and tacos hamburguesa, and of course a selection of special Cinco de Mayo cocktails will be availiable.

Las Perlas in downtown LA will be serving homemade tacos, live music, $6 margaritas, and $10 palomas from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.

BOA Steakhouse in West Hollywood and Santa Monica will be serving grilled chicken tortas and specialty cocktails including an Oaxaca Smoke with mezcal and grand marnier and a Sunset Heat with Patron tequila, serrano pepper, and pomegranate.

Casa Vega is hosting a Cinco de Mayo celebration with a photo booth and props, specialty cocktails, and its tacos and tequila throwback Thursday celebration.

Vegas locations of Borracha (Green Valley Ranch) and Libre (Red Rock) are hosting Cinco de Mayo celebrations including Mexican inspired dishes and specialty drinks.

For more Los Angeles dining and travel news, click here.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko̞ ðe̞ ˈma̠ʝo̞] in Mexico, Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. [1] [2] Led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, the victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

More popular in the United States than in Mexico, [3] [4] Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. [5] [6] [7] Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. [8] In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. [1] [9] Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.


Watch the video: Cinco De Mayo In Los Angeles (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Bajin

    You have kept away from conversation

  2. Meinhard

    Wacker, what a phrase ... the excellent thought

  3. Tautilar

    the quality is not very good and there is no time to watch !!!

  4. Worrell

    Excuse, that I interfere, but it is necessary for me little bit more information.



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