Other

Brian Ellis Visits The Daily Meal and Shares His Potato-Free Gnocchi Recipe

Brian Ellis Visits The Daily Meal and Shares His Potato-Free Gnocchi Recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Chef Brian Ellis of The Smith and Jane Restaurant prepared menu favorites for guests to enjoy

Kristen Hom

Brian Ellis Visits The Daily Meal and Shares His Potato-Free Gnocchi Recipe

Kristen Hom

Chef Brian Ellis, executive chef at The Smith and Jane Restaurant, visited The Daily Meal kitchen last night to prepare some menu highlights and other delicious bites. Chef Ellis worked as the chef de cuisine at Jane Restaurant when it first opened in 2003 and was the first executive chef at the first Smith restaurant when it opened in 2007 in the East Village.

Sweet, with a Kick

Kristen Hom

Chef Ellis’ Spicy Salmon Tartare features rice cake, Sriracha, and soy caramel.

A Spoonful of Flavor

Kristen Hom

Tuna poke is combined with cashews, yuzu, and mango for a bright, flavorful bite.

A Taste of the Sea

Kristen Hom

Ellis’ poached lobster roll is served in bite-sized pieces.

A Stunning Presentation

Kristen Hom

Steak frites are topped with a balsamic onion jam and sea salt.

A Spin on a Classic

Kristen Hom

This Caesar salad features parmesan frico and boquerones.

Not Your Ordinary Chip

Kristen Hom

Yukon gold potato chips are topped with a blue cheese fondue and chives.

Finishing Touches

Kristen Hom

Chef Ellis plates his crab cakes with Alabama sauce and apple chutney.

All Smiles in the Kitchen

Kristen Hom

Chef Ellis takes a moment to chat with Jim Spanfeller and Colman Andrews.

There’s Always Room for Dessert

Kristen Hom

Guests enjoyed Ellis’ interpretation of s’mores, served in small glasses with tiny spoons to match.

A Special Treat

Kristen Hom


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.


Updated: 20:00 BST, 19 November 2011

A new book of no-problem recipes from the one-time queen of clean is a family-inspired delight

Mmmum's the word for this prizewinning shortbread (scroll below for the recipe)

Before Aggie MacKenzie pulled on her Marigolds to confront the nation’s
dirty secrets in the alarming TV soap-and-water opera How Clean is Your House?, she was more likely to be found up to her elbows in flour. As a former head of the Good Housekeeping Institute – and a self-confessed baking fanatic – her first love is food, so putting together a cookbook is something she’s dreamed of doing for a long time.

The result is a collection of everyday crowd-pleasers (one recipe is called no-hassle gnocchi, another no-fuss queen of puddings) which have kept Aggie and her family contented around the kitchen table over the years. And it really is a family affair, with ideas from her two sons, Rory and Ewan, a venerable aunt, ‘my cousin’s lovely ex-wife’, assorted friends, granny the ‘legendary’ scone-maker, and even her ex-husband Matthew, whose meatballs with pasta Aggie says she would choose as her last supper. ‘He’s lovely – we’re still really good friends.’

But pride of place must go to Aggie’s mother, whose fondly remembered recipes from a Scottish childhood (beef stew and dumplings, mince and tatties, scotch broth) include this ‘award-winning shortbread’, a name not lightly bestowed. ‘Whenever there was a country show when we were growing up, my mum would always be asked to enter her bakes for the competitions. The shortbread won first prize every time.’

My mum’s award-winning shortbread

The trick is to shape it, leaving a gap between the edge and the rim of the tin, then bake until it’s golden, taking it as far as you can without over-browning.



Comments:

  1. Larnell

    Did you quickly come up with such a matchless phrase?

  2. Kigakus

    I am sorry that to intervene, he would like to propose another solution.

  3. Lester

    It's a pity that I can't speak now - I'm forced to go away. I will be set free - I will definitely give my opinion on this matter.

  4. Mell

    Not to say he's bigger.



Write a message