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Black Barley, Fennel, and Radish Salad


Ingredients

  • 2 cups black or pearl barley, rinsed
  • 1 large fennel bulb (about 10 ounces), 2 tablespoons fronds set aside, bulb cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch slices
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill plus 1/2 cup dills prigs, divided
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
  • 4 large radishes, thinly sliced, divided
  • 1/4 cup oil-cured olives, pitted, halved lengthwise

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 425°. Place barley in a medium pot and add water to cover by 1 1/2 inches. Season with salt. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer uncovered until barley is tender and water is absorbed, 40–45 minutes. Spread out barley on a large rimmed baking sheet; let cool.

  • While barley is cooking, toss fennel slices and 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium bowl to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Spread fennel slices out in a single layer on another rimmed baking sheet. Roast until fennel is crisp-tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 18 minutes. Let fennel cool on baking sheet.

  • Whisk orange juice, lime juice, shallot, 2 Tbsp. dill, and zest in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk in remaining 1/2 cup oil; season orange vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

  • Transfer barley to a large bowl; add roasted fennel, along with any accumulated juices on baking sheet. Add half of radishes, olives, and 1/4 cup dill sprigs. Drizzle 1/2 cup orange vinaigrette over and toss to coat; season with salt and pepper. Arrange salad on a large platter.

  • Scatter remaining radishes, reserved fennel fronds, and remaining 1/4 cup dill sprigs over salad. Pass remaining orange vinaigrette alongside for drizzling over.

  • DO AHEAD: Barley and fennel can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover separately and refrigerate.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 360 Fat (g) 15 Saturated Fat (g) 2 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 57 Dietary Fiber (g) 12 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 7 Sodium (mg) 150Reviews Section

BLACK RADISH, CARROT, AND FENNEL SALAD WITH PECORINO CHEESE
from Joyce Goldstein's The Mediterranean Kitchen
(this is for a single portion. can be multiplied.)

1 small handful arugula (about 3/4 cup loosely packed)
1/4 cup Citrus Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
3 large paper-thin slices black radish
6 thin diagonal slices carrot (about 2 inches long), blanched
6 thin slices fennel
6 to 8 long thin curls pecorino or Parmesan cheese

1 1/4 cups mild olive oil
6 to 8 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Toss the arugula with enough of the vinaigrette to coat and place on a salad plate. Arrange the radish slices on top, then the carrot and fennel. Drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette and top with the curls of cheese. To make Citrus Vinaigrette, whisk all ingredients together. Makes about 1 1/2 cups, enough for 4 to 6 salads.

Radish Salad (Serves 4)

2 cups diced radishes: any kind : black, daikon, watermelon.
3/4 cup Gruyere cheese cubed
2 scallions chopped
1/3 cup mayonnaise (I might use greek yogurt instead)
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon sour cream
Romaine lettuce (optional)

Toss together radishes, cheese (Gruyere or Swiss) and scallions, reserving a few chopped green parts of scallion for garnish. Combine mayo, mustard and sour cream together in a small bowl, mixing well. Add to radish mixture, being sure to coat all pieces. Cover and refrigerate, allowing flavors to blend. To serve, spoon salad onto romaine leaves and sprinkle with chopped greens. Or serve with crackers. This salad might also be used as a canape topping or as the filling for a grilled sourdough sandwich with melted Gruyere cheese.)

RADISH SLAW
This could also be good without the cabbage.

2-3 black Spanish radishes, scrubbed and grated
3 cups finely shredded cabbage
1 cup coarsely grated carrots, any color
1/2 cup thinly sliced green or red onion
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley, cilantro, or mint leaves

In a bowl toss together the radishes, the cabbage, the carrots, the onion, the lemon juice, the sugar, the oil, the herb, and salt and pepper to taste.

BLACK SPANISH RADISH REMOULADE

2 medium black Spanish radishes
3 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon wine vinegar
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves

Coarsely grate the radishes. Rinse a large bowl with hot water, dry it, and in it whisk the mustard with 3 tablespoons hot water. Add the oil in a slow stream, whisking until the dressing is emulsified, and whisk in the vinegar and salt and pepper to taste. Add the grated radish and the parsley and toss the mixture well. Serves 6.

Sweet Sour Black Radish Salad
This is a recipe that was inspired by Elizabeth Schneider in her book Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini

2 T olive oil or butter, divided use
2 small/medium black spanish radishes, cut into 1/4 inch dice
2 leeks, trimmed and thinly sliced
1/4 cup rice wine or white wine vinegar
1/4 cup water
about 2 teaspoons honey

Cook in 1 T of oil or butter over medium heat the leeks and radishes for about 3 minutes, until softened and beginning to brown. Add vinegar and water and cook, stirring often, until radishes are soft but still a little firm, about 5 more minutes. Add honey to taste. Season with salt and pepper.

3 medium black Spanish radishes
2 teaspoons Salt
2 teaspoons Red pepper (or less to taste)
2 teaspoons Sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons rice Vinegar
2 tablespoons Minced scallion
l teaspoon minced garlic

Peel radish and cut into match stick pieces about 2 inches long. Sprinkle with salt and let stand for 10 minutes. Rinse to remove excess salt and drain well. Wrap radish in several thicknesses of cheesecloth and squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

In bowl, combine radish with red pepper, sugar, vinegar, scallion and garlic, mixing well. Serve at once or refrigerate to blend flavors. Serves 8 as side dish.


Barley, Fennel, and Radish Salad and Lazy Day Radish Pickles

It’s just the begining of the season where we eat what we grow and grow what we eat and radishes are full on! But what else does one do with the abundance of radishes besides slice them into green salads? I found this fragrant barley salad with fennel, dill and radishes in a recent issue of bon appetit. It looked so beautiful and I was inspired to branch out beyond my usual comfort zone of whole grains and give it a whirl. As it turned out, the salad worked great over a bed of lettuce, as well as a side for the dinner plate and packing it for lunch was convenient and substantial. If you also have dill and fennel in your garden you’re in luck.

2 cups black or pearl barleyKosher salt or sea salt

1 large fennel bulb (about 10 oz.), cut lengthwise in 1/4 inch slices

2 tablespoons finely chopped fennel fronds set aside

2 tablespoons plus 1/2 cup olive oil

freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill, plus 1/2 cup dill sprigs divided

1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

4 large radishes, thinly sliced

1/4 cup oil-cured olives pitted, halved lengthwise.

Preheat oven to 425. Place rinsed barley in a medium pot and add water to cover by 1 1/2″ (4 1/2 cups). Season with sea salt. Bring to a boil reduce heat and simmer uncovered until barley is tender and water is absorbed, anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour. While it’s cooking DO NOT STIR. Just leave it to simmer. Stirring it will break the whole grain down giving you a texture you don’t want for this salad. After about 45 minutes, I like to tip the pot to one side to see if there is any remaining liquid to cook out. If there is any extra liquid it will pool in the corner of the pot and you’ll get an idea of how much longer to cook it. When the barley is finished cooking, spread it out on a large rimmed baking sheet let cool.

While barley is cooking, toss fennel slices and 2 tablespoons oil in a medium bowl to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Spread fennel slices out in a single layer on another rimmed baking sheet. Roast until fennel is crisp-tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 18 minutes.

Let fennel cool on baking sheet. * You can cook the barley and roast the fennel a day ahead. Cover separately and refrigerate.

Whisk orange juice, lime juice, shallot, 2 tablespoons of dill, and zest in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk in remaining 1/2 cup oil season orange vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

Transfer barley to a large bowl add roasted fennel, along with any accumulated juices on baking sheet. Add half of radishes, olives, and 1/4 cup dill sprigs. Drizzle 1/2 cup orange vinaigrette over and toss to coat season with salt and pepper. Arrange salad on a large platter.

Scatter remaining radishes, reserved fennel fronds, and remaining 1/4 cup of dill sprigs over salad. Pass remaining vinaigrette alongside for drizzling over.

Our favorite seed for red radish that has a very mild bite is the french breakfast radish. Sliced with red onions, these pickles turn a clean pink a novel and seasonal color that adds appeal to your summer plate.

1 clean wide mouth quart jar

a large bundle of freshly picked radishes, about 10-12, cleaned and trimmed, sliced thin

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Layer sliced radishes and sliced red onion in a quart jar. Whisk vinegar, honey and salt in a small bowl. Add 1 cup water and stir making sure honey and salt are dissolved. Pour over radishes and onions. Make sure the vegetables are under the water line. Let sit at room temperature for an hour. They are ready to eat, or store refrigerated up to 2 weeks. They are great on salads and sandwiches, or just for something tangy and fresh on your plate. Try them at your next BBQ!


Yoghurt and barley soup

Give bite and substance to your soup with a handful of pearl barley. Paired with creamy yoghurt and a wealth of spices, this is a nourishing bowlful.

Serves 4-6
2 tbsp light-flavoured oil
1 onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
4cm piece ginger, peeled and grated
1 tbsp garam masala
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp chilli powder
Zest of 1 lime or 1 dried lime
200g pearl barley
150g red lentils
400g chopped tomatoes
1 litre vegetable stock
200g greek yoghurt
Salt and black pepper

To finish
4 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, very thinly sliced
1 bunch coriander, roughly chopped

1 Heat the oil in a large high-sided pan over a medium heat. Fry for 3 minutes, or until it starts to soften and take on some colour. Throw in the garlic, ginger, spices and lime. Cook for a further 2 minutes, stirring all the time.

2 Add the barley, red lentils and chopped tomatoes to the pan, stir well, cook for 1-2 minutes then pour in the stock. Bring to the boil then simmer for 45 minutes, or until the lentils have almost disappeared into the soup and the barley is very tender.

3 Meanwhile, prepare the topping. Heat the oil in a large frying pan until hot and fry the onions for 8-10 minutes or until dark golden and crisp. You might have to do this in batches adding a little more oil as you go. Make sure the onions don’t burn. Remove from the pan and set aside to drain on kitchen paper.

4 When the soup is cooked, add plenty of seasoning, stir in the yoghurt and allow to heat through – but don’t boil. Squash the dried lime (if using) in the pan to release the juices. Ladle into bowls and serve topped with crisp onions and coriander.
Rosie Reynolds


Directions

Coat a 4-quart or larger slow cooker with cooking spray.

Crush fennel seeds with the bottom of a saucepan.

Combine the fennel seeds, diced fennel, barley (or brown rice), carrot, shallot and garlic in the slow cooker.

Add chicken broth, 1 cup water and dry white wine, and stir to combine.

Cover and cook until the barley (or rice) is tender, but pleasantly chewy, and the risotto is thick and creamy, 2½ to 2½ hours on high or low.

Shortly before serving, cook green beans according to package instructions and drain.

Stir the green beans, Parmesan, olives, lemon zest and pepper into the risotto.

If it seems dry, heat the remaining ½ cup water and stir it into the risotto.


Jeweled Barley Salad

It is perfectly OK to grab the kitchen shears, slip on the flip-flops, and simply cut single-variety lettuce leaves from your backyard still warm from the sun. Give the leaves a quick rinse (if needed), toss with dressing, and top with a grated Wisconsin cheese of your choice.

Nothing could be finer. No toasting. No chopping. No elevating.

However, for those of you who desire something more, or wish to stretch a salad into a more elaborate main course, here are some outstanding salad recipes featuring many ingredients that thrive in Wisconsin.

The Jeweled Barley Salad recipe from NuGenesis Farm is one to rave about. Seriously, it's that good. The satisfying combination of barley, toasted almonds, and balsamic vinegar with the sweetness of several fruits makes it the perfect lunch or light summer dinner. Top with grated cheese if desired Parmesan works well.

Rating: 0 Rating: 0 Rating: 0

Making the most: Grain, Fennel and Radish Salad with Butter-Lemon Dressing

After weeks of glorious weather, London has reverted to the overcast skies and cool temperatures it likes best. I’m glad that I made the most of the warmer weather while it was here, with much window-opening, skirt-wearing and salad-making. I’m also hoping that it will get a bit warmer in time for the weekend, as I’ve got a shopping date with my sister and some London Marathon-watching (from the comfort of my couch, of course) on the agenda.

But even if the weather doesn’t take a turn for the better, this grain and vegetable salad should fit in just fine. One of those perfect early-spring recipes, it combines crisp veggies with hearty mixed grains and wraps them all in a bright-yet-rich dressing.

Both fennel and radishes have that crisp, cool bitterness that heralds the arrival of warmer weather. Personally, I took my time warming to either of these vegetables something about the aniseed-like flavour of fennel and the sharpness of radish put off the younger me. But now that I happily eat them, and together they’re just perfect.

I’m calling this salad a grain one, but using the term somewhat loosely. I used a mix of farro, quinoa and giant couscous, but the purist in me is feeling obligated to point out that only one of those is, in fact, a grain. But no matter what you’re aiming for here is an interesting mix of texture and flavour barley, wheat berries and millet would all work well, too.

What makes this salad really sing is the dressing. Butter might seem a strange choice and sure, olive oil would be tasty too (not to mention healthier). But salted butter is a natural ally of radishes, and paired with lemon juice and pepper, it brings all the flavours together and just works. Whatever the weather.


Middle Eastern salad is where it's at

Chickpeas can be a little underwhelming in their raw state, but when seasoned, spiced with baharat and roasted until crunchy, the humble legume transforms into something entirely more-ish. You can serve this salad warm or roast the pumpkin and chickpeas ahead of time for a quick throw-together dinner or ready-made work lunch. If you’re cooking for carnivores, simply add grilled chicken or lamb.

Warm lentil salad

Don't think for a second that lentils don't have a wild side. This vegetarian salad is sweetened with pomegranate molasses, made from the dark red juice of the pomegranate fruit, which has been cooked down to form a thick, tangy syrup. Teamed with beets and pumpkin, lentils have just upped the ante big time in this popping bowl.

Black rice with labne + pomegranate

The black rice with pops of colour from onion, carrot, pistachio, dried cranberries and pomegranate seeds is mesmerising. Once you've dabbled in jewelled rice territory, it'll be hard to go back to steamed.

Cauliflower + cranberry

The taste of homemade molasses is magnificent – sweet, sour and beguiling and this easy salad of pearl barley, cauliflower, a selection of chopped nuts and fresh herbs celebrates all of those flavours and more.


The Kitchen's Best Recipes for a Springtime Celebration

Whether you're hosting Easter dinner or simply cooking for your family, these fresh picks will usher in the season.

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Chamomile French Toast

The secret to Geoffrey's next-level French toast is the rich, eggy custard in which he dips the buttery brioche bread. The custard features chamomile-soaked cream, which gently seeps into the bread and offers a light, floral flavor.

Sunny’s Quick Steamed Broccoli Salad

Sunny adds a light but creamy mayo dressing to bring together this colorful side dish.

Spring Radish Salad

Bring out the beautiful colors of spring with this showstopping dish. A medley of peppery radishes are the star here, while a grapefruit juice and honey dressing delivers the perfect balance of tangy and sweet.

Italian Easter Pie

Jeff&rsquos pie boasts a buttery crust that sandwiches hearty layers of sausage, salami, capicola and asparagus, all bound together with a creamy ricotta mixture.

Avocado Limeade

Take your limeade game to the next level by imparting the fresh flavors of avocado and a homemade cilantro syrup into this refreshing drink.

Herby Stuffed Tomatoes

Switch up your dinner routine with Alex&rsquos clever plant-based dish. Chickpeas, spinach and arugula, flavored with a blend of cumin and ginger, make for a bold tomato stuffing and a great presentation.

Farfalle with Fresh Herbs and Goat Cheese

All you need is 25 minutes to whip up this comforting pasta dish. Combine half-and-half and goat cheese with lemon zest and mint for impressive results.

Mini Broccoli Quiches with Prosciutto Crusts

Arrange strips of salty prosciutto in muffin tins so they become the base of these easy, cheesy broccoli-stuffed quiches.

Garlic and Herb Chicken and Pasta Salad

The secret to making this pasta salad in a hurry is taking advantage of a store-bought timesaver: ready-to-go grilled chicken. It's tossed with fresh fixings like juicy grape tomatoes, fragrant herbs and creamy mozzarella for a colorful, satisfying salad.

Skillet Roasted Pork Chops with Spring Vegetables and Mustard Sauce

A simple coating of smoky spices imparts bold flavor right on the tender pork chops, while a topping of bright peas and radishes offers a fresh contrast.

Veggie Top Pesto

Look beyond the usual basil, and try making pesto using other fresh greens. Here this five-minute recipe comes together with the tops of some of your favorite veggies: carrot fronds, beet greens and celery leaves.

Shoestring Carrot Fries

These crispy beauties may look like sweet potatoes, but they're actually all carrot. A few sprays of apple cider vinegar and a sprinkle of orange zest brighten up the flavor of the fried veggie.

Baked Parm Green Bean Fries

Thanks to a coating of nutty Parmesan cheese, these quick-fix fries turn out crispy on the outside without needing to be deep-fried.

Spring Vegetable Salad with Horseradish and Lemon Vinaigrette

Take advantage of the multiple varieites of fresh, vibrant peas in season right now when prepping this quick-fix salad, finished with fragrant herbs.

Apple-Mint Rack of Lamb

A rub of fresh herbs, including mint, rosemary and thyme, lends bold flavor to Marcela Valladolid's juicy lamb chops. She likes to serve them with a sweet-savory apple compote.

Rhuberry-Basil Pink Lemonade

This isn't your ordinary pink lemonade, thanks to GZ's use of all-natural colorings and flavors: a rhubarb-steeped syrup and a strawberry puree laced with fresh basil.

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Berry Crisp Dump Cake

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The Perennial Kitchen

In The Perennial Kitchen, James Beard Award–winning author Beth Dooley provides the context of food’s origins, along with delicious recipes, nutrition information, and tips for smart sourcing. More than a farm-to-table cookbook, this book expands the definition of “local food” to embrace regenerative agriculture, the method of growing small and large crops with ecological services.

Beth's natural ability for warm and descriptive food prose is such a joy to read and experience, and it shines in The Perennial Kitchen.

Sean Sherman, author of James Beard Award–winning The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen

Knowing how and where food is grown can add depth and richness to a dish, whether a meal of slow-roasted short ribs on creamy polenta, a steaming bowl of spicy Hmong soup, or a triple ginger rye cake, kissed with maple sugar, honey, and sorghum. Here James Beard Award–winning author Beth Dooley provides the context of food’s origins, along with delicious recipes, nutrition information, and tips for smart sourcing.

More than a farm-to-table cookbook, The Perennial Kitchen expands the definition of “local food” to embrace regenerative agriculture, the method of growing small and large crops with ecological services. These farming methods, grounded in a land ethic, remediate the environmental damage caused by the monocropping of corn and soybeans. In this thoughtful collection the home cook will find both recipes and insights into artisan grains, nuts, fruits, and vegetables that are delicious and healthy—and also help retain topsoil, sequester carbon, and return nutrients to the soil. Here are crops that enhance our soil, nurture pollinators and song birds, rebuild rural economies, protect our water, and grow plentifully without toxic chemicals. These ingredients are as good for the planet as they are on our plates.

Dooley explains how to stock the pantry with artisan grains, heritage dry beans, fresh flour, healthy oils, and natural sweeteners. She offers pointers on working with grass-fed beef and pastured pork and describes how to turn leftovers into tempting soups and stews. She makes the most of each season’s bounty, from fresh garlic scape pesto to roasted root vegetable hummus. Here we learn how best to use nature’s “fast foods,” the quick-cooking egg and ever-reliable chicken how to work with alternative flours, as in gingerbread with rye or focaccia with Kernza® and how to make plant-forward, nutritious vegan and vegetarian fare. Among other sweet pleasures, Dooley shares the closely held secret recipe from the University of Minnesota’s student association for the best apple pie. Woven throughout the recipes is the most recent research on nutrition, along with a guide to sources and information that cuts through the noise and confusion of today’s food labels and trends.

Beth Dooley looks back into ingredients’ healthy beginnings and forward to the healthy future they promise. At the center of it all is the cook, linking into the regenerative and resilient food chain with every carefully sourced, thoughtfully prepared, and delectable dish.

$27.95 ISBN 978-1-5179-0949-9
216 pages, 48 color plates, 7 x 9, May 2021

Beth Dooley is author or coauthor of several cookbooks, including Savoring the Seasons of the Northern Heartland, The Northern Heartland Kitchen, Minnesota’s Bounty, The Birchwood Cafe Cookbook, Savory Sweet: Simple Preserves from a Northern Kitchen, Sweet Nature: A Cook’s Guide to Using Honey and Maple Syrup, and The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen (Best American Cookbook, James Beard Award, 2018), all from Minnesota. In Winter’s Kitchen is her memoir about finding her place in the Midwestern food scene. She lives in Minneapolis.

Mette Nielsen’s photographs have illustrated numerous books, newspapers, and magazines. A talented master gardener, she created the edible garden for the Birchwood Cafe in Minneapolis, collaborated on The Birchwood Cafe Cookbook and Minnesota’s Bounty, and was a coauthor of Savory Sweet and Sweet Nature.

Beth's natural ability for warm and descriptive food prose is such a joy to read and experience, and it shines in The Perennial Kitchen.

Sean Sherman, author of James Beard Award–winning The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen

Beth Dooley’s The Perennial Kitchen is not only a cookbook but also a guide for how to transform our food and agriculture systems. The regenerative agriculture practices described here are good for the planet—and delicious!

Danielle Nierenberg, president, Food Tank, and 2020 recipient of the Julia Child Award